First particle tracks seen in prototype for international neutrino experiment

The largest liquid-argon neutrino detector in the world has just recorded its first particle tracks, signaling the start of a new chapter in the story of the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE).

Advertisements

Electrons ride plasma wave

There is a good chance that soon a new door will open to physicists, offering them new insights into the mysteries of the universe. The international AWAKE collaboration has made a breakthrough in its efforts to build a new type of particle accelerator. _MPI

LHC physicists finally uncover Higgs ‘bottom’ decay

The two largest experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), ATLAS and CMS, have observed a previously undetected way that the Higgs boson can decay — into an elementary particle called the bottom quark, and its antiparticle._Nature

Where do particle names come from?

One of the most difficult things in learning particle physics for the first time is to understand all of the various names. There are dozens and dozens and sometimes many names can apply to one particle or a single name can apply to many particles. It’s all very confusing. Luckily, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln made this video to help you sort it all out.

The secret life of Higgs bosons

The Higgs boson has existed since the earliest moments of our universe. Its directionless field permeates all of space and entices transient particles to slow down and burgeon with mass. Without the Higgs field, there could be no stable structures; the universe would be cold, dark and lifeless.

Grand Unification Dream Kept at Bay

Στο κενό η γοητευτική θεωρία περί ενοποιημένων φυσικών δυνάμεων στις απαρχές του χρόνου _Quanta Magazine

The world’s newest atom-smasher achieves its ‘first turns’

One of the world’s top particle accelerators has reached a milestone, achieving its «first turns» — circulating beams of particles for the first time — and opening a new window into the universe, a view that will give physicists access to a record rate of particle collisions in a tiny volume in space.__PNNL

Charge-parity violation

Matter and antimatter behave differently. Scientists hope that investigating how might someday explain why we exist.
One of the great puzzles for scientists is why there is more matter than antimatter in the universe—the reason we exist.
It turns out that the answer to this question is deeply connected to the breaking of fundamental conservation laws of particle physics. The discovery of these violations has a rich history, dating back to 1956._Symmetry