Your own virtual heart for non-invasive heart diagnostics

EPFL mathematician Alfio Quarteroni and his team are building a virtual heart model based on personalized medical images that may one day help cardiologists and cardiac surgeons non-invasively diagnose pathological heart conditions. The team recently modeled and simulated the behavior of a patient’s aortic valve._EPFL

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Blood test to personalise depression treatment for the first time

Scientists at King’s College London have developed a blood test that accurately and reliably predicts whether depressed patients will respond to common antidepressants, which could herald a new era of personalised treatment for people with depression._ King’s College of London

An implant to prevent Alzheimer’s

In a cutting-edge treatment for Alzheimer’s disease, EPFL scientists have developed an implantable capsule that can turn the patient’s immune system against the disease._EPFL

Scientists develop very early stage human stem cell lines for first time

Scientists at the University of Cambridge have for the first time shown that it is possible to derive from a human embryo so-called ‘naïve’ pluripotent stem cells – one of the most flexible types of stem cell, which can develop into all human tissue other than the placenta.__The University of Cambridge

Regular aspirin use found to protect against overall cancer risk

An analysis of data from two major, long-term epidemiologic studies finds that the regular use of aspirin significantly reduces the overall risk of cancer, a reduction that primarily reflects a lower risk of colorectal cancer and other tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. __MGH News

Scientists «break the ice» on organ banking

Hebrew University researchers develop a solution for long-term preservation of cells and organs for transplant, as part of a global alliance to bank organs__The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Brain, body and mind: understanding consciousness

This isn’t new technology – the first animal EEG was published a century ago – but computational neuroscientist Chennu has come up with a way of combining its output with a branch of maths called graph theory to measure the level of a person’s consciousness. What’s more, he’s developing the technology as a bedside device for doctors to diagnose patients suffering from consciousness disorders (such as a vegetative state caused by injury or stroke) to work out the best course of action and to support family counselling._ The University of Cambridge

Breaking the vicious circle of heart failure

In patients with heart failure, the pumping power of the heart decreases in a fatal downward spiral. Pharmacologists at ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich have now succeeded in breaking this vicious circle in the mouse model. Their approach could one day also benefit humans
News release • February 19, 2016 • ETH Zurich • By Fabio Bergamin

Breaking through the bacteria barrier

New microfluidic device may speed up DNA insertion in bacteria, the first step in genetic engineering
News release • MIT News Office • February 19, 2016 • By Jennifer Chu