Cosmic rays: 50 year-old mystery has been solved

In a paper that was published in Science on 22 September 2017, the Pierre Auger Collaboration reports observational evidence demonstrating that cosmic rays with energies a million times greater than that of the protons accelerated in the Large Hadron Collider come from much further away than from our own Galaxy._

Milky Way’s black hole may be spewing out cosmic rays

Mysterious high-energy particles known as cosmic rays zip through space at a wide range of energies, some millions of times greater than those produced in the world’s most powerful atom smasher. Scientists have long thought cosmic rays from inside our galaxy come from supernova explosions, but a new study has fingered a second source: the supermassive black hole at the heart of the Milky Way. With this new result, the search for cosmic ray origins, which has frustrated scientists for more than 100 years, has taken an unexpected new twist._ Science AAAS

The mystery of particle generations

The Standard Model of particles and interactions is remarkably successful for a theory everyone knows is missing big pieces. It accounts for the everyday stuff we know like protons, neutrons, electrons and photons, and even exotic stuff like Higgs bosons and top quarks. But it isn’t complete; it doesn’t explain phenomena such as dark matter and dark energy.

IceCube sees highest-energy neutrino ever found

For more than a century, scientists have known that particles called cosmic rays rain down on the Earth from space. Some of these cosmic rays slam into our atmosphere at energies higher than we could possibly reach in any earthly particle accelerator. It is still a mystery where these particles come from, but it seems that they are from energetic sources outside our galaxy. One suspicion is that they are coming from active galaxies swirling around distant black holes.